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Suzanne Greenlaw, ethnobotanist and bead artist, photographed in a Brown Ash grove, Orono. Ms. Greenlaw is a citizen of the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, a PhD student in the School of Forest Resources at the University of Maine, and a member of the Native Advisory Council of the Abbe Museum. Brown Ash (Fraxinus nigra) is a cultural and economic cornerstone of the indigenous people of Maine. Acadia National Park is developing new policies based on Ms. Greenlaw’s research that will allow federally-recognized tribes to re-establish sustainable sweetgrass and brown ash harvesting.

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Filename
SuzanneGreenlaw_9709.jpg
Copyright
2019
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4746x7111 / 16.0MB
www.jenniferbooher.com
Contained in galleries
Historians of the Wabanaki Nations
Suzanne Greenlaw, ethnobotanist and bead artist, photographed in a Brown Ash grove, Orono. Ms. Greenlaw is a citizen of the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, a PhD student in the School of Forest Resources at the University of Maine, and a member of the Native Advisory Council of the Abbe Museum. Brown Ash (Fraxinus nigra) is a cultural and economic cornerstone of the indigenous people of Maine. Acadia National Park is developing new policies based on Ms. Greenlaw’s research that will allow federally-recognized tribes to re-establish sustainable sweetgrass and brown ash harvesting.